Tale of Two Plants

Tale of Two Plants.


Days 3 and 4 of picture a day for a year.

     In 2013 someone at Gail’s work gave everyone a poinsettia for their office.  Naturally, she brought it home for the break.  If we thought about it at all, I both of us expected the plant  to die shortly after the holidays as every other poinsettia had in the past.  Well, it didn’t and here it is 14 months later. It’s looking a little peaked.  I think it might be root bound. But, maybe it is just worn out after producing five new blooms


     The second plant is a fig that I bought from the Fig Man at the farmer’s market.  The poor thing had a rough first year.  I planted it according to the page long instructions, but it did not thrive.  In fact, we were pretty sure it was done for when by the middle of May it had not shown any sign of life.  While I was in Texas for Mother’s Day, Gail yanked it out of the ground.  However, when she examined it, there was a tiny green sprout.  She wrapped it in wet paper towels and when I got home I planted it in a big pot and put it out on the patio where it would get lots of sun.  This autumn, I brought it in and put it in a western window.
As you can see, it’s doing well.  

Despite the Fig Man’s assurances that it would do well in the spot I described to him, I think it is now an indoor plant by winter and a patio plant in the summer.



   

Project:  A picture a day for a year

February 22, 2015

About a week ago I got a new camera. I’ve been taking a lot of pictures since. With inspiration and encouragement from Debra Beck, an old UW friend, I’ve decided to work on the project of taking and posting on this blog a picture a day for a year.

To be realistic, I know I may not be able to post every day, but rules for myself are that I must take a picture a day…either with my Nikon or iPhone, then post as often as possible.

Here’s my first effort, poor as it may be in illustrating what I wanted to show, canyon winds.
It’s kind of hard to tell much from this picture, but the wind is really blowing the branches of this pine around.  I need to learn how to show the motion I want to capture without ending up with one big blur.

The canyon winds occur when a front crosses the area from the east or northeast.  The front  moves across the high plains and bumps up against the Sandia Mountains.  Looking for an easy  route through the mountains, the winds find Sedillo Canyon and pour down it.  Today we have had gusts to over 63 mph with sustained winds about 40 mph.  This puts all our bushes and trees in a frenzy of motion.  That’s what I wanted to capture.  I hope by the end of this year, I’ll be able to.